AC

How the first world war changed north-west England

(By Matt Fidler/The Guardian) An exhibition to mark 100 years since the start of the first world war opens at the IWM North on Saturday. It reveals the important contribution made by the north-west during the war and includes loans of treasures such as original manuscripts from the Bodleian library in Oxford of first drafts of poems by Wilfred Owen

Workers tow a trolley of raw rubber from a warehouse at the factory of Charles Macintosh and Sons Ltd in Manchester in September 1918.
Workers tow a trolley of raw rubber at the factory of Charles Macintosh and Sons Ltd in Manchester in September 1918. Photograph: Digitised by Leanne Rodgers-Gibb
A group of workers of the glucose factory of Messrs Nicholls, Nagel & Co in Trafford Park, c.1918
A group of workers at the glucose factory of Messrs Nicholls, Nagel & Co in Trafford Park in about 1918. Photograph: IWM: Ted Dearberg
Soldiers of the Lancashire Fusiliers, 29th Division, are seen on board an old Royal Navy battleship used in the third phase of operations in the Dardanelles Straits before they disembarked at 'W' and 'V' beaches off Cape Helles on 5 May 1915.
Soldiers of the Lancashire Fusiliers, 29th Division, on board an old Royal Navy battleship in the Dardanelles strait off Cape Helles on 5 May 1915. Photograph: IWM
Lancashire Fusiliers in a flooded communication trench, showing wire. Opposite Messines, near Ploegsteert Wood. January 1917.
Lancashire Fusiliers in a flooded communication trench opposite Messines, near Ploegsteert Wood, Belgium, in January 1917. Photograph: Digitised by Leanne Rodgers-Gibb

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